The Best Bikes for Beginners in 2022

The Best Bikes for Beginners in 2022:full review

Warm weather is just around the around, which means it’s time to start thinking about outdoor activities. And there’s no better way to enjoy the great outdoors than biking. After all, biking is a great way to stay in shape, and a cheaper, eco-friendly alternative to commuting. But finding the right bike isn’t easy. That’s why we did the hard work for you and tried and tested the best bikes for men to buy now.

There are few better ways to get in shape or maintain your fitness than by riding a bicycle. But you don’t need a high-end road-racing model to do it. Hybrid bikes (also known as fitness bikes) offer a balance of lightweight speed and a confidence-inspiring upright position that can make cycling more comfortable and fun. They’re also ideal as daily commuter bikes, due to their wide tires for smoothing out choppy pavement and gravel, simple and sometimes maintenance-free drivetrains, and disc brakes for more control, especially on slick surfaces.

The Best Bikes for Beginners in 2022: Our Top Picks

Most Versatile for BeginnersHuffy Hardtail Mountain Bike
Most AffordableSchwinn High Timber Youth/Adult Mountain Bike
Speedy All-ArounderMongoose Dolomite Mens Fat Tire Mountain Bike
Best overallIDS Home unYOUsual U
Editor’s PicksRoyalBaby Freestyle Kids Bike

Top1.Huffy Hardtail Mountain Bike

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Assembly tutorial video located beside the images; with a Denim Blue hardtail frame and 21 speeds to conquer the trails, the Huffy Stone Mountain is ready for outdoor adventures; just follow the steps in our product manual

The indexed Shimano TZ-31 rear derailleur combines with the micro-shift twist shifter to deliver 21 speeds on-demand for uphill climbing, downhill riding, or pure acceleration; removable rear derailleur guard ensures consistent gear operation

Top2.Schwinn High Timber Youth/Adult Mountain Bike

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Lightweight 16-inch steel frame is the perfect bike for rides around your neighborhood or trails. The 24-inch wheel frame fit riders 5’5” to 6’0” inches tall

Bicycle comes with an alloy crank that provides steady gear changes that cause less maintenance

Mountain bike has twist shifters with a rear derailleur to make gear changes quick and easy

Wide knobby mountain tires sit on a lightweight and durable alloy wheel that adds stability and balance to the rider for all weather and terrain types

Top3.Mongoose Dolomite Mens Fat Tire Mountain Bike

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Conquer any off-road trail with ease with this steel-framed mountain bike with supersized all-terrain knobby 26-inch wheels that fit riders 64 to 74 inches tall

The threadless headset is adjustable for riders of different heights; For added speed and performance, the strong, lightweight alloy rims keep the weight down

Ride comfortably with beach cruiser pedals and ensure safety with front and rear disc brakes

Top4.IDS Home unYOUsual U

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20 – inch folding bicycle designed for commuting and exercising.

Shimano 6 speed shifter and derailleur. semi-alloy front and rear V-brake.

WANDA 20″ x 1.75 tires

Quick removable front handle stem. with alloy silver color cap & PVC black bell.

Top5.RoyalBaby Freestyle Kids Bike

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RoyalBaby Freestyle kid’s bike was designed by inspiration from the BMX spirit, It’s all about fun, creativity, freedom, and friends. The sporty-looking is perfect for the next cycling star!

Each bike equipped with RoyalBaby patent sealed bearing for smooth pedaling. Training wheels come with 12/14/16 inch bikes, making it easy to maintain balance and learn to pedal even for young beginners. The water bottle and holder adds more joy to the ride. Fully adjustable seat and handlebar will give extra space when kids grow taller

Shortest travel distance grips provides extra braking efficiency, sturdy steel frame and 2.4″ wide cylinder tires will accompany every adventure of your little one and bring them home safe and sound

The bike comes 95% pre-assembled, with an elaborated instruction manual and all tools needed in the box. It is easy enough to put together in 15 minutes

Flat Bar vs. Drop Bar

A hybrid bike starts with a traditional road bike platform: fast-rolling 700c wheels and a lightweight, efficient frame. But while a road bike typically comes outfitted with a drop bar, a hybrid bike’s signature feature is a flat handlebar. This provides a wide hand stance for better control, easy brake-lever access, and a more upright position that’s comfortable and conducive to looking over a shoulder in traffic. These are just a few of the reasons why new cyclists and commuters are often drawn to this type of bike.

But a proper fitness bike is more than just a road bike with a flat bar: It’s a bike that’s been specifically designed to be ridden with one. Chad Price, core research and development director at Specialized, says that a fitness bike typically has a longer reach than a road bike, resulting in better handling from a flat bar and shorter stem.

Disc Brakes

One of the best technologies to come to fitness bikes is disc brakes. Although they cost a little more than rim-style brakes, discs offer more control and precision, particularly in wet conditions. They also don’t require as much hand strength to operate, making them a reliable choice for rides with long, winding descents.

Some lower-cost bikes may come with cable-actuated disc brakes, a cheaper alternative that’s not quite as powerful or as low maintenance as a fully hydraulic disc-brake system but that delivers similar all-weather performance and reliability.

The Right Gearing

Most fitness bikes come with two chainrings in the front and between nine and 11 cogs in the rear. Having more gears in the back allows you to fine-tune your shifting so you can keep a steady cadence, no matter the terrain. Bikes with three front chainrings typically cost less, but the third ring can make shifting less precise. A single-ring option simplifies shifting and cuts down on maintenance but may not have the range you need for climbing.

Belt Drives and Internally Geared Hubs

A belt drive (which takes the place of a chain) with an internally geared hub (where all the gearing is packaged inside the rear hub’s shell and sealed from the elements) requires less maintenance than a traditional chain-and-derailleur drivetrain. It’s incredibly reliable and very clean, says Andrew Lumpkin, CEO of Spot Bikes. A belt drive is also easy to use (one shifter controls everything) and, perhaps best of all, lets you change gears while sitting still at a stoplight. It’s a great, low-maintenance option if you can afford it, though it adds a small amount of weight.

How We Evaluated These Hybrid Bikes

As a former bike messenger, bike tour leader, and writer for bike publications, I’ve been asked to recommend a lot of bikes over the years. Anticipating these queries, I’ve made a big effort to test as many hybrids and city bikes as I can—not only because they’re great for commuting, fitness, and fun, but also because these are the kinds of bikes that my non-bike-geeky friends and family are most interested in buying. I used my own experiences to inform these selections, as well as the work of Bicycling’s team of expert bike testers, who spent weeks on many of these models—commuting on them, taking them out on long bike path cruises, and using them to join fun group rides—to suss out the best (and least desirable) qualities. Because some of our top picks are no longer in stock, we also included a few that we didn’t test but still recommend based on our experience with similar bikes in the same range.

Bicycle Types: How to Pick the Best Bike for You

So Many Choices

When trying to decide on the best type of bike, think about these questions:

  • Who do you ride with?
  • What do they ride?
  • What have you had in the past that you liked?
  • What have you had in the past that you disliked?
  • Where would you like to ride your new bike?

If you are buying a bike to ride with a group of friends, buy something similar to what they ride. You will not be able to keep up with road bikes if you are on a mountain bike or cruiser. And a road bike cannot go on the dirt or the sand.

If you enjoyed a three speed as a child, you may find this a fun bike again. If you disliked the road bike you bought a few years ago, perhaps a mountain bike would be better.

Road Bikes

Road bicycles are designed to be ridden fast on smooth pavement. They have smooth, skinny tires and “drop” handlebars, and can be used for on-road racing. They are usually lighter than other types of bicycles. They can be ridden on paved trails, but most people find them uncomfortable and unstable on unpaved trails. Most road bikes are not capable of carrying heavy loads, so are not very suitable for commuting or touring.

Cyclocross Bikes

Cyclocross bicycles are a special type of road bike designed to be raced on a mixed surface course (combination of pavement, unpaved trails, gravel, grass). They have a drop handlebar like regular road bikes, but the tires are a littler wider for more off-road traction, and they have a different style of brake that helps to prevent mud buildup in the frame. Cyclocross bicycles are sometimes called ‘cross bikes or cx bikes for short.

Touring Bikes

Touring bicycles are another special type of road bike. They are designed to be ridden on pavement, but are more durable for use on self-supported long-distance riding. They have all of the necessary mounting bolts for cargo racks and fenders, and although they still have a drop handlebar, they usually have a more relaxed frame design so that the rider is more upright, for more comfort when riding long distances for multiple days at a time. They have a lower gear range compared to regular road bikes, to allow for carrying heavy loads up steep hills. They also make good commuter bicycles, because of their durability and ability to carry heavy loads.

Adventure Road Bikes

Adventure Road Bicycles are one of the newest categories of bicycle. They are sometimes called all-road bikes, any-road bikes, or gravel bikes, and are the most versatile sub-category of road bike. Similar to cyclocross bikes, they have drop handlebars and the ability to use wider tires. The frame geometry is longer and more upright compared to a cyclocross bike, however, making these bikes more suitable for long days in the saddle, light touring, and commuting.

Triathlon/Time Trial Bikes

Triathlon/Time Trial Bicycles are road bikes with a special design that maximizes their aerodynamic properties. The handlebars are also a special aerodynamic design that allows you to crouch forward while riding, to minimize the wind resistance against your body. Triathlon/time trial races usually have staggered starts, where each racer starts on his/her own; these bicycles are usually not allowed to be used in mass-start races.

Fitness Bikes

Fitness Bicycles have most of the advantages of regular road bikes–lightweight frames and relatively narrow tires for efficiency on pavement–with a flat or upright handlebar. These bikes are designed for people who want a light, high-performance bike, but don’t like the drop-handlebar riding position of a regular road bike. These bicycles are sometimes called flat-bar road bikes or performance hybrid bikes. Most of them can accept somewhat wider tires, to make them suitable for use on unpaved trails. They usually have the ability to mount cargo racks and fenders, which make them good commuter bikes.

Track/Fixed-Gear Bikes

Track/Fixed-Gear Bicycles or fixies are designed to be ridden on a velodrome, which is a banked oval track specifically for bicycle racing. Some commuters prefer track bikes, however, due to their simple design, which makes them easy to maintain. They have a single gear that does not provide the ability to coast, so if the bike is moving, your feet must be pedaling. For even more simplicity, some riders prefer to not have brakes, since the fixed-gear mechanism can act as a brake. Most track bikes have drop handlebars, but some riders outfit theirs with flat or upright handlebars.

Mountain Bikes

Mountain Bicycles are design for riding rough off-road trails. They have flat or upright handlebars, and a very low gear range for pedaling up steep trails. Most mountain bikes have some type of shock absorbers or suspension. Mountain bikes with front suspension only are called hardtails; mountain bikes with both front and rear suspension are called full-suspension bikes or duallies. Mountain bikes with no suspension are called rigid. Mountain bikes can be outfitted for use as touring or commuting bikes, although they would not be as light or efficient as traditional touring or commuting bikes. Fat bikes, with their extremely wide tires, are included in the mountain bike category.

Hybrid Bikes

Hybrid Bicycles were originally conceived to provide the advantages of both road bikes and mountain bikes. Their large, padded seats and upright handlebars provide a comfortable riding position, and are best for casual riding around the neighborhood or bike paths, short-distance commuting, and errands around town. They can be ridden on paved roads, but are not as lightweight or efficient as road bikes. They are ideal for paved or unpaved bike trails, but are not appropriate for rough off-road mountain bike trails. The tires are usually a medium-width with a semi-smooth tread, to provide a fairly smooth ride on pavement, but enough grip and cushion on unpaved trails. Most hybrid bikes have front suspension to smooth out small bumps, but some are fully rigid. Hybrid bikes used to also be referred to as cross bikes, but that term is not used any more in order to avoid confusion with cyclocross bikes (see above).

Dual-Sport Bikes

Dual-Sport Bicycles are a sub-category of hybrid bikes oriented towards riders who want the multi-surface versatility of a hybrid bike, but want a little more aggressive style and riding position. They have a flat or upright handlebar, although not as upright as regular hybrid bikes; they usually have a smaller, more performance-oriented seat, rather than a large comfort seat. Most have front suspension. Dual-sport bikes make good commuter bikes, and are also good for touring on unpaved trails.

Cruiser Bikes

Cruiser Bicycles are similar to hybrid bikes, in that they are designed for casual riding, and have a very comfortable, upright riding position, and a large, comfortable seat. Cruisers usually have wide “balloon” tires, and handlebars that are even more upright, and in some cases, swept back compared to hybrid bikes. Most cruiser bikes are single-speed or 3-speed, and have the old-fashioned coaster brake (where you pedal backwards to stop). They can be used for short-distance commuting and errands, as long as your route is fairly flat. Some cruiser bike manufacturers make a wide array of colorful models available, to suit the fashion tastes of any bike afficionado.

Flat-Foot Comfort Bikes

Flat-Foot Comfort Bicycles are a sub-category of cruiser bikes. They have an elongated frame design that pushes the pedals a few inches forward of the seat. This allows you to ride with the seat low enough so that you can place your feet flat on the ground when you are stopped, but you still get the full extension of your legs while pedaling. All Electra Bicycle Company bikes have the flat-foot technology; some other manufacturers have created their own flat-foot designs.

City Bikes

The term “city bike” doesn’t really refer to a specific category of bikes; it’s more of a general descriptive term. They might also be called “commuter” or “urban” bikes, although many of the bikes listed on this page can be used quite well for riding and commuting in a city. However, there is a certain type of bike that some people have in mind when they use the term “city bike.” This bike has characteristics of both a hybrid bike and a cruiser bike–usually the upright riding position of a cruiser, but the wheel size of a hybrid bike.

A city bike might also have some or all of these features that make it more amenable to riding in regular clothes, as opposed to cycling-specific clothing:

  • Fenders
  • Chain guard
  • Skirt guard on rear wheel

A city bike might also have an internally-geared rear hub for ease of use and maintenance, and a built-in generator and lights for safety when riding after dark.

These bikes are also sometimes called “Dutch bikes,” because of their resemblance to the everyday bikes used in Amsterdam and other bike-friendly European cities.

BMX Bikes

BMX Bicycles are popular with kids because of their small size, but they are used by adults and kids alike for various styles of trick and stunt riding.

Folding Bikes

Folding Bicycles are ideal for those who need to travel with their bike, want a bike to keep on their boat or plane, or who live in small apartments and don’t have a lot of storage space. They’re also good for commuters who need to take their bike on a bus or train for part of their commute, or who don’t have a safe place to park their bike at work. Most folding bikes have smaller wheels, which makes the bike a little less efficient and trickier to handle than a standard bike, but most folding bike fans feel the benefits outweigh the disadvantages.

Recumbent Bikes

Recumbent Bicycles have a long, low design and a full-size seat with a backrest. Recumbents are available in two-wheel and three-wheel designs. Many recumbent riders feel that they are the most comfortable option available for bicycling. However, they are more difficult to pedal up hills, and they can be a challenge to carry from one place to another in a motor vehicle.

Tandem Bikes

Tandem Bicycles are “bicycles built for two.” They come in all styles, from cruiser tandems and hybrid tandems for the bike path or boardwalk, off-road mountain bike tandems, and high-performance road racing tandems.

Adult Tricycles

Adult Trikes are ideal for older folks who still want to get around under their own power, or those with balance issues or other special needs. They are also popular in environmentally-consious industrial/warehouse applications.

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