5 best battery-powered heaters for camping in 2022

5 best battery-powered heaters for camping in 2022

When deciding on a safe supplemental heating source for your home or outdoor exertion, battery-powered heaters are one of the most searched-for options. Unfortunately, quality heaters that operate on traditional batteries, like those you likely have packed away in the junk drawer, don’t exist.

Tent heaters are more popular than you might think, especially for those looking to camp year round and through the colder months. They are small, compact, and easy to carry around and make camping in the colder months of the year much easier and safer.

Picking one of the best battery-powered tent heaters isn’t easy, however. These appliances retail in a wide array of price points, styles, and power levels – and thanks to the sheer number of choices available in the market, the ostensibly simple selection process can quickly become a seemingly impossible task.

5 best battery-powered heaters for camping in 2022

1DEWALT DXH12B Portable HeaterView on Amazon
2Mr. Heater F232000 MH9BX BuddyView on Amazon
3Sengoku Kerosene HeaterView on Amazon
4Mr. Heater Hero 35000BTU Cordless Propane HeaterView on Amazon
5Campy Gear Chubby 2 in 1 Portable Propane Heater & StoveView on Amazon

Our guide will introduce you to some of the top battery-powered personal heaters and battery-powered heater alternatives. Consider your space and portability needs to decide which heater is the best.

1.DEWALT DXH12B Portable Heater

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Pros

  • Powered by propane (heating) and batteries (3 USB chargers, LED lights, fan)
  • It can generate twice the heat a standard space heater can generate (up to 12,000 BTU)
  • 1 lb propane tank can last up to 7 hours, and you can refuel it quickly (much quicker than recharging a battery, of course)
  • Additional safety features for indoor use; ODS and thermoelectric safety valve

Cons

  • It does weigh 14 lbs empty and 15 lbs full; that might be too heavy if you need to hike to your camping location.
  • A battery powers USD charges, and batteries run out; you have an extra concern to change the batteries once in a while

The DEWALT DXH12B is the closest to the true battery-operated heater of all these heaters. This heater uses batteries (20V MAX or FlexVolt batteries), but it only uses them for extra features like powering 3 USB plugs, LED lights, and the fan.

The main power is still generated by propane. This is one of the most capable battery-powered heater alternatives; it can produce up to 12,000 BTU heat when running on 100% capacity. At the lowest setting, the 1 lb propane tank is can provide heat for up to 7 hours. Of course, you can always bring a 20 lbs propane tank with you on camping and refuel the DEWALT DXH12B 20 times.

Due to high heating output and indoor safety features, the DEWALT DXH12B is the closest to the best battery-operated tent heater. It has a factory-installed Oxygen Depletion Sensor (ODS) and a thermoelectric safety valve. Both of these make using DEWALT DXH12B inside the tent much safer.

Now for the batteries part: Propane produces the heating output. On top of that, DEWALT DXH12B has 3 USB chargers (to charge your phones, for example), a LED light on top (useful when the night falls), and a fan that distributes the heat evenly. All of these are electric-powered featured, and to power them, DEWALT DXH12B uses 20V MAX or FlexVolt batteries.

2.Mr. Heater F232000 MH9BX Buddy

View on Amazon

Pros

  • Provides 4,000 BTU / 9,000 BTU of heating output (more than a standard 1,500W electric heater)
  • One of the more portable units with below 10 lbs
  • 1 lb propane tank can last for up to 7 hours
  • Probably the most popular alternative to the non-existent battery-powered heaters
  • Very budget-friendly price tag (below $150)

Cons

  • At the highest heating output, the running time on 1 filling can drop to about 2-3 hours.
  • It doesn’t have light; lights might be helpful to when camping (when the dark falls)

Mr. Heater MH18B is the most popular battery-powered heater for camping alternatives. Its 1 lb propane tank can generate 4,000 BTU (low setting) to 9,000 BTU (high ground) heating output.

As you can see, the tank/bottle that contains the propane is neatly attached to the heater. That is a 1 lb propane tank lasting up to 7 hours on the lowest heating setting. As you might imagine, when going camping, bringing a 20 lbs propane tank with you is smart to easily and quickly refuel the Mr. Heater MH18B heater.

With below 10 lbs total weight (9 kg, to be exact), it is very portable. If there were a battery-operated heater for camping, it should have pretty much the exact specifications as the Mr. Heater MH18B.

3.Sengoku Kerosene Heater

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When you have a space of up to 1,000 square feet to heat, the Sengoku KeroHeat CV23K(H) is the best choice. This indoor kerosene space heater is ideal for an emergency heat source. The push-start button and easy flame adjuster mean you can start warming up quickly and customize the heat to your needs.

The 1.9-gallon fuel tank will provide up to 12 hours of warmth. We especially like that a limited 2-year warranty backs this unit. It will heat well beyond that of any battery-powered heater, even in spaces with tall ceilings or little insulation, like a garage or warehouse.

4.Mr. Heater Hero 35000BTU Cordless Propane Heater

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The powerful battery-fueled Mr. Heater Hero offers 35,000 BTU, heating up to 850 square feet of space. The heater requires a specific battery or electricity to ignite the propane and run the fans that blow out the hot air. Even while distributing a large amount of heat, the Mr. Heater Hero stays cool to the touch.

The battery offers up to 8 hours of use, and the heater can be used while the battery is charging. A 20-pound propane tank provides up to 12 hours of warmth. At 17 pounds, the unit is relatively easy to transport and is built with a sturdy handle for a good grip. We love that it is equipped with an accidental tip-over and flame safety shutoff.

5.Campy Gear Chubby 2 in 1 Portable Propane Heater & Stove

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The Campy Gear Portable Heater & Stove is a small but mighty device. This unit can produce 9,000 BTU and operates with a unique 360° radiant heating design. The heating of this device allows you to stay warm while you enjoy the outdoors. Plus, the one-year warranty means you can get help if anything goes wrong in the first 12 months.

One of our favorite features of this unit is the dual-functionality of heating and cooking. Settings allow you to choose “heat” or “heat and cook” to meet your needs. The stand supports a single 12-inch pot or pan. When entirely fueled, this unit will burn for up to 2 hours but can work longer if a 1 lb propane cylinder is added.

Pros vs. cons of battery-powered heaters

Battery-based heaters, or hand warmers, are a great portable option for sporting events, camping, or outdoors during cold weather. The heaters are safe to operate and usually hold a charge for 8 to 12 hours.

These personal warmers, or rechargeable battery-powered heaters, will keep your hands or feet warm, but not much else. The devices aren’t designed to heat any type of space other than a glove and won’t keep you warm if you need a battery-powered tent heater.

How efficient are battery-powered heaters?

Whole-home battery-powered space heaters do not exist, so we’ve developed a list of products that can be used indoors or out and as a battery-powered heater alternative. Many options on the market today are safe to use indoors and stronger than battery-powered heaters. These heaters can also provide supplemental heat to your house in winter at an economical cost.

Propane heater

Propane is commonly used for furnaces and HVAC systems but also to power small, portable heaters. It is clean burning fuel, and these heaters are available in vented and vent-free forms (the latter is prohibited in California). Instead of using a battery, propane heaters have a fuel tank and an ignition system. There are several types of propane heaters, including radiant, convective, cabinet, tank top, and forced air.

  • Radiant and convective heaters distribute warm air in all directions, delivering a balanced warmth throughout the space.
  • Cabinet heaters are portable and can be moved to a specific space to warm the immediate area. They often come on wheels for easy mobility and do not require electricity.
  • Tank top heaters connect directly to a propane fuel tank and are great for outdoor use at campsites, tailgating, or outdoor gatherings.
  • Forced air heaters distribute warmth in the direction you choose. They come in various sizes and should be operated according to the user’s manual regarding indoor vs. outdoor use.

The BTUs a propane heater is capable of producing will depend on its size and the capacity of the fuel tank. Smaller heaters produce anywhere between 4000 and 8000 BTUs an hour, capable of heating 200 to 300 square feet of space. Larger heaters with a bigger fuel tank can have up to 18,000 BTUs an hour, enough to heat 500 square feet of space. Your choice should be based on the area you are planning to heat and how much you are willing to spend on fuel. A propane heater is one of the best alternatives to battery-powered heaters for camping, fishing, traveling, and use in outdoor areas such as the patio and garden.

Electric heater

Another popular alternative to a battery-powered space heater is the electric heater. It is the cleanest and safest of all portable heaters, produces no exhaust or fumes, and works with the press of a button. Most electric space heaters produce forced hot air; some can even be turned into an air cooler in summer. You can take an electric heater anywhere if you have a power outlet.

Electric heaters come in all sizes and prices. You can place them on a table, in a corner, or have them wall mounted. Depending upon the size of the heater, it can heat up to 250 square feet of space without requiring any kind of ventilation. A standard electric space heater has a wattage of 1500 and can produce up to 5000 BTUs per hour. This is usually sufficient for heating a small room, the inside of a car, a tent, or outdoor spaces such as a garage or a patio.

When Should I Use a Tent Heater?

Tent heaters are more popular than you might think, especially for those looking to camp year round and through the colder months. They are small, compact, and easy to carry around and make camping in the colder months of the year much easier and safer.

Picking one of the best battery-powered tent heaters isn’t easy, however. These appliances retail in a wide array of price points, styles, and power levels – and thanks to the sheer number of choices available in the market, the ostensibly simple selection process can quickly become a seemingly impossible task.

This article will discuss a tent heater, what you should be looking for in a tent heater, and the best ones on the market right now.

Do I Need A Tent Heater?

The short answer is yes – and that’s because in a survival situation such as outdoor camping, ensuring that you stay warm by any means necessary is essential in fighting off infections and viruses.

There is also sufficient scientific evidence proving that the four seasons of the year influence emotional behavior and human moods differently. The gleams of sunshine we take for granted keep the inner being glowing and the physical being erupting with positive energy.

According to an editorial by the Huffington Post, warmer days have been scientifically linked to mood boosts. The article pointed out that Spring is also the same period you’ll find most people stepping out of their comfort zones to enjoy the bright sunshine.

Why do you limit your delights to natural seasons when you can easily manipulate the elements?

In addition to using a high-quality tent, sleeping in a good-quality sleeping bag, and wearing sufficiently warm clothes, investing in a battery-powered tent heater is another efficient way to manipulate the environment to your liking and combat the cold. These units are particularly essential in colder climates where your tent’s walls aren’t as reliable as your home’s walls in protecting against the cold.

Remember, significant drops in temperature levels will put you at the risk of flu, hypothermia, and other avoidable ailments. These health risks are even higher for camping enthusiasts over 60 and those with pre-existing chronic conditions.

So, ensure you do not get caught off guard. Pack as required, and do not forget always to bring along a battery-powered tent heater to face such dangers head-on easily.

When Should I Use a Tent Heater?

In frigid climates.

Camping enthusiasts who limit their outdoor expeditions to the fall and spring can likely manage to get by without investing in one of the best battery-powered tent heaters.

However, all-season campers will have to add this appliance to their camping arsenal. Tent heaters will award you the freedom to camp whenever you feel like it, regardless of the time of the year. Rather than leaving the decision up to Mother Nature, you’ll get to choose when your adventures take place.

Let’s take winter camping, for instance.

Not long ago, camping during winter was taboo. Today, however, thanks to the advancement of technological inventions, utilities like battery-powered tent heaters award us excellent levels of comfort when we camp in cold weather.

Of course, you ought to note that camping in cold climates isn’t recommended if you’re a beginner camper, even with one of the best tent heaters in your arsenal. If you fall under this category and are still hell-bent on camping in the cold, then ensure you read extensively on winter camping trips and survival tricks that could come in handy should anything go wrong.

You’ll also need to be sufficiently equipped with reliable winter camping gear (these include a high-quality sleeping bag, a 4-season tent, and heavy clothing.)

With that in mind, if you take rainchecks and confirm that no dangerous weather has been forecasted and the trip poses no sort of serious risks, then you can rest assured that you’ll gain a lot from your winter camping experience. Campsites around the world are not nearly as crowded during these periods as you would find in fair weather, and you will also be able to bond with Mother Nature in an entirely different way.

You can also take pride in knowing that you spent a whole weekend in the open regardless of the harsh elements. Not most campers are willing to take on such a challenge.

Now comes the (arguably) most important question you should ask yourself before making a final, educated decision while picking a battery-powered tent heater.

Are Tent Heaters Safe To Use?

While the heaters offer a lot of conveniences, they also retail with some serious safety and health risks. Even the slightest mistake or negligence can result in a fire, which can, in turn, result in a raging forest fire (and sometimes even death.)

Many regulators and companies have made significant strides to protect the environment and their customers against some dangers. However, there are still tips you should keep in mind to protect yourself and your loved ones even further.

Safety considerations of battery-powered heaters

Regardless of the type of portable heater you select, consider all relevant safety measures. Safety tips must be followed to prevent fires, burns, electrical shock, and carbon monoxide poisoning.

  • Only buy a heater that an accredited laboratory has tested
  • Do not leave the heater unattended, especially in the presence of pets or children
  • Make sure to have proper ventilation if using a heater that produces fumes
  • Purchase a heater with an auto shut-off function and a thermostat to prevent overheating
  • Always check the heater for loose connections, broken cables, or plugs before use
  • Never leave the heater running while sleeping at night or when no one is home
  • Clean the heater regularly to prevent the buildup of dust or debris
  • Consider the size of the heater; careful not to use a large heater for a small room
  • Always store the heater in a clean, dry place when not in use
  • Do not use a heater near flammable substances such as clothes, upholstery, wood, or cables

It’s also essential to properly store your heater fuel and know how long each lasts.

How to store propane

Store propane tanks on a flat, outdoor surface that doesn’t receive direct sunlight. Avoid storing propane tanks in a work shed or garage, as those spaces are often enclosed. If the propane tank valve is left open, vapors could fill the room, creating a dangerous environment.

How to store kerosene

Store kerosene in a specified kerosene container on a flat, outdoor surface that doesn’t receive direct sunlight. Too much sunlight can degrade the fuel, rendering it useless when you need it for heat. Do not store kerosene in your heater. It’s best to use kerosene within six months of opening.

Safety Features While Using A Tent Heater

Some safety features you should keep in mind while picking the best battery-powered tent heater include:

1. Tip-Over Switches

If you tip or knock over the tent heater, most of them can automatically switch off as a health and safety measure. Low oxygen sensors have also been included in some camping heaters, and in most of these, the feature will go as far as constraining the use of the tools in extremely high altitudes.

The feature will likely kick in at altitudes exceeding 6,000 feet above sea level.

2. Carbon Dioxide and Monoxide Sensors

High concentrations of either carbon monoxide or carbon dioxide gases in confined spaces can be toxic. Many tent heaters in the market today retail with special sensors that can detect this and automatically shut down the heater’s fuel sources.

As you may have thought, the low oxygen sensor in some heaters can also perform similar auto-shutoff maneuvers.

3. Overheating Protection

Most heaters I’ve come across retail with auto shut-off features that will keep your device at safe temperatures.

Is there a battery-powered tent heater?

We have seen a question: “What about battery-powered tent heaters, and do they work?” Battery-powered tent heaters do exist, but the reality of the situation is that these are very small, low-power personal heaters.

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